Plot

Grounding Architecture to Landscapes. Landscape Designer, Landshaper, Lover of Meadows, Nature, Music, Modern Gardens, Grasses, Perennials, Textures & Water
catalogingandcardigans:

I want to buy this as my weekend house and spend a few years fixing it up and maybe paying it off through vacation rentals (and actually just found this property on AirBnB, but with no reviews, wonder if that is a bad sign). If only I was twice my age, that might be a reasonable idea. 

catalogingandcardigans:

I want to buy this as my weekend house and spend a few years fixing it up and maybe paying it off through vacation rentals (and actually just found this property on AirBnB, but with no reviews, wonder if that is a bad sign). If only I was twice my age, that might be a reasonable idea. 

(via cabinscabinscabins)

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

(via asapscience)

txchnologist:

RFID Tags Show Elite Bees Are Made, Not Born

by Michael Keller

Some bees in a hive have a right to complain. Researchers studying individual foraging behavior found that a minority group of elite colony members work much harder than others. 

By attaching tiny radio frequency identification tags to the backs of bees, University of Illinois scientists realized that 20 percent of bees that leave the nest to forage account for 50 percent of the total food brought back.

“We found that some bees are working very, very hard – as we would have expected,” said lead researcher Gene Robinson, who heads the university’s Institute for Genomic Biology. “But then we found some other bees that were not working as hard as the others.”

Read more and check out the video below.

Read More

(via sagansense)

guildhall:

Seeds That Fell On Stony Ground

The Garden at Prospect Cottage

It’s hard not to consider the garden that Derek Jarman created in the last years of his life as metaphor for his struggles in the face of illness from AIDS.

Near the end of his life and already suffering from the disease, the gifted filmmaker moved just two hours from London but to a different planet altogether. He purchased a piece of property and an itinerant shack that he transformed into a garden and cottage. It is located on an unforgiving stretch of the English seaside and in the shadow of the Dungeness nuclear power station. The area was never a seaside resort as the waters were not suitable for swimming and the weather less than lovely, to say the least.

Dungeness is perhaps the most unlikely place for an English garden. The only plant life that really flourishes are indigenous species like blackthorn, sea kale and gorse. But Jarman loved the area’s otherworldly atmosphere and almost unnatural light.  These elements were sympathetic to his exacting yet lush aesthetic and he became a magpie sculptor, adapting stones, driftwood, found objects and discarded tools as he intervened to shape his land.

On one side of Prospect Cottage, Jarman lettered the lines from a passionate lyric by John Donne. In deepest black they read:

BUSY old fool, unruly Sun, 

Why dost thou thus,

Through windows, and through curtains, call on us ? 

Must to thy motions lovers’ seasons run ? 

Saucy pedantic wretch, go chide 

Late school-boys and sour prentices, 

Go tell court-huntsmen that the king will ride, 

Call country ants to harvest offices ;

Love, all alike, no season knows nor clime, 

Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time. 

Thou, Sun, art half as happy as we, 

In that the world’s contracted thus ; 

Thine age asks ease, and since thy duties be 

To warm the world, that’s done in warming us. 

Shine here to us, and thou art everywhere ; 

This bed thy center is, these walls thy sphere.

(via carex)

archatlas:

Casa Tomada Rafael Gómez Barros

"The urban interventions are meant to represent displacement of peasants in his native Columbia due to war and violence, themes that resonate in one form or another in any country his work is displayed in. Crafted from tree branches, fiberglass, and fabric, the 2 foot ants are particularly striking when seen clustered aggressively on facades of buildings."

(via landscape-architecture-design)

tipsforarchitectureschool:

IMAGINARY OBSTACLES

The general idea is that most of the obstacles we face in our lives are imaginary. Everything from our daily diet, to who we want to be when we grow up is determined by the choices we make. And we make choices based on pre-conceived notions.
:::: Which are completely imaginary (and sometimes not provided by experience, but by word of mouth) ::::
Even if you have done something 100 times, you still can’t 100 percent guarantee that the 101st time you do it will yield the same results. You can only assume, and usually, you’re right. However, this holds a lot of us back from being persistent with our goals and ambitions.
I like using the “Going to the Gym” theory. We all know that the hardest part about going to the gym is getting there. But once we get dressed, make the drive, and are right in the middle of a rep, it is almost easy to motivate yourself into doing more while you’re there.
Getting there, however, is the most difficult part. We will actually NOT go to the gym for YEARS because we make up excuses:
I’ll go tomorrow - I don’t want to be sore for work later- I just ate a big meal and don’t want to get sick - I don’t have any clean gym clothes - I’ll just eat better instead…
This really has nothing to do with the gym, and everything to do with getting in your own way. As I get older, I see more clearly everyday that if you wanted to quit everything you were doing now to do something different, maybe something you’re more passionate about, you can.
I get a lot of messages about people wondering if Architecture is right for them and that is such a difficult thing to answer. It might not be AT ALL!! But I don’t want to be the judge of that. 
So here is my advice:
Find something that intoxicates you with the thought of doing it. Think of your DREAM JOB, no matter what it is. Something that you could see yourself doing and be genuinely happy doing for the rest of your life, and do that.
It takes a lot to wrap your head around the idea of being successful doing something people might tell you is unrealistic, but you have to think for yourself. Make no mistake that you have the power to become anyone you want to be, and do anything you want to do. Some of us just have more obstacles to overcome, and you can’t be afraid of sacrificing everything you know to make that dream a reality.
But you have to stop listening to EVERYTHING people tell you, and start listening only to the pieces that make yourself fit together in your own way. If you do everything  people tell you to do, your life will never have permanence. Because everyone’s opinion of what is possible is different.
If you are getting into architecture because someone said you should do it, but your real passion in somewhere else. Do that other thing. If you have always wanted to become an architect since you were a little kid, and feel that design is your passion, then maybe this is a good fit for you. And who knows, you might not know if it is a good fit for you and you just want to find out more, but don’t let anyone make a decision for you. Figure it out for yourself and you will find much more satisfaction in the long run.
This reminds me of a great story called The Fisherman and The Businessman. It gives a pretty cool perspective.
—
Hope this helps some of you. :)
Cheers,
- Mark, tipsforarchitectureschool

tipsforarchitectureschool:

IMAGINARY OBSTACLES

The general idea is that most of the obstacles we face in our lives are imaginary. Everything from our daily diet, to who we want to be when we grow up is determined by the choices we make. And we make choices based on pre-conceived notions.

:::: Which are completely imaginary (and sometimes not provided by experience, but by word of mouth) ::::

Even if you have done something 100 times, you still can’t 100 percent guarantee that the 101st time you do it will yield the same results. You can only assume, and usually, you’re right. However, this holds a lot of us back from being persistent with our goals and ambitions.

I like using the “Going to the Gym” theory. We all know that the hardest part about going to the gym is getting there. But once we get dressed, make the drive, and are right in the middle of a rep, it is almost easy to motivate yourself into doing more while you’re there.

Getting there, however, is the most difficult part. We will actually NOT go to the gym for YEARS because we make up excuses:

I’ll go tomorrow - I don’t want to be sore for work later- I just ate a big meal and don’t want to get sick - I don’t have any clean gym clothes - I’ll just eat better instead…

This really has nothing to do with the gym, and everything to do with getting in your own way. As I get older, I see more clearly everyday that if you wanted to quit everything you were doing now to do something different, maybe something you’re more passionate about, you can.

I get a lot of messages about people wondering if Architecture is right for them and that is such a difficult thing to answer. It might not be AT ALL!! But I don’t want to be the judge of that. 

So here is my advice:

Find something that intoxicates you with the thought of doing it. Think of your DREAM JOB, no matter what it is. Something that you could see yourself doing and be genuinely happy doing for the rest of your life, and do that.

It takes a lot to wrap your head around the idea of being successful doing something people might tell you is unrealistic, but you have to think for yourself. Make no mistake that you have the power to become anyone you want to be, and do anything you want to do. Some of us just have more obstacles to overcome, and you can’t be afraid of sacrificing everything you know to make that dream a reality.

But you have to stop listening to EVERYTHING people tell you, and start listening only to the pieces that make yourself fit together in your own way. If you do everything  people tell you to do, your life will never have permanence. Because everyone’s opinion of what is possible is different.

If you are getting into architecture because someone said you should do it, but your real passion in somewhere else. Do that other thing. If you have always wanted to become an architect since you were a little kid, and feel that design is your passion, then maybe this is a good fit for you. And who knows, you might not know if it is a good fit for you and you just want to find out more, but don’t let anyone make a decision for you. Figure it out for yourself and you will find much more satisfaction in the long run.

This reminds me of a great story called The Fisherman and The BusinessmanIt gives a pretty cool perspective.

Hope this helps some of you. :)

Cheers,

- Mark, tipsforarchitectureschool

(via landscape-architecture-design)