Plot

Grounding Architecture to Landscapes. Landscape Designer, Landshaper, Lover of Meadows, Nature, Music, Modern Gardens, Grasses, Perennials, Textures & Water
amnhnyc:

Spiders are important predators. By one estimate, the spiders on one acre of woodland alone consume more than 80 pounds (36 kg) of insects a year. (Those insect populations would explode without the predators.)
Spiders employ an amazing array of techniques to capture prey.
They play tricks:
Some pirate spiders of the family Mimetidae fool their prey: other spiders. They vibrate the spiders’ webs the same way a struggling insect might. Then, when the host spiders come close, the pirates grab them.
They spit: 
Spiders of the genus Scytodes catch prey by ejecting a glue from their chelicerae (spider mouthparts that end in fangs and inject venom into prey). Once it hits, the gooey substance shrinks, trapping the prey in place.
They use a home field advantage:
Lynx spiders of the family Oxyopidae hunt on plants. They are agile, jumping from stem to stem, and have better vision than many other spiders.
Learn more spider hunting techniques on our blog. 

amnhnyc:

Spiders are important predators. By one estimate, the spiders on one acre of woodland alone consume more than 80 pounds (36 kg) of insects a year. (Those insect populations would explode without the predators.)

Spiders employ an amazing array of techniques to capture prey.

They play tricks:

Some pirate spiders of the family Mimetidae fool their prey: other spiders. They vibrate the spiders’ webs the same way a struggling insect might. Then, when the host spiders come close, the pirates grab them.

They spit: 

Spiders of the genus Scytodes catch prey by ejecting a glue from their chelicerae (spider mouthparts that end in fangs and inject venom into prey). Once it hits, the gooey substance shrinks, trapping the prey in place.

They use a home field advantage:

Lynx spiders of the family Oxyopidae hunt on plants. They are agile, jumping from stem to stem, and have better vision than many other spiders.

Learn more spider hunting techniques on our blog

(via sagansense)

jillraggett:

Plant of the Day
Wednesday 27 August 2014

In the productive garden of Askham Hall, Cumbria, they are growing the half-hardy annual Callistephus chinensis Chrysanthemum form (China Aster) as a cut flower. It was lovely to see the traditional system for supporting cut flowers. These plants flower from late summer into the autumn. They are robust, long lasting and wilt resistant as a cut flower.

To grow these plants sow the seeds in March to April on the surface of a good free draining, damp seed compost. Do not cover the seed as light helps germination. Germination needs 20-30C temperature so place in a propagator or inside a polythene bag until after germination. Transplant seedlings when large enough to handle into trays or pots. Grow on in cooler, well lit conditions and plant out after the risk of frost has past 30cm apart.

Jill Raggett

thesciencestudio:

The Weight of Mountains

Here’s a short film by a children’s book illustrator about “the processes by which mountains are created and eventually destroyed, based upon the work of British geographer L. Dudley Stamp.” It’s eye-meltingly gorgeous and starkly scientific. The tone is meditative and incantatory, turning geological terms into epic poetry. If you’ve ever wanted to read John McPhee’s “Annals of the Former World” but only have 11 minutes, watch this.

This week’s picker is John Pavlus — a designer on the inside and a writer/filmmaker on the outside. He makes things that make things make sense for places like NPR, HHMI, Scientific American, Fast Company, Nautilus, and others.