Plotscape

itscolossal:

For the past four years, 16-year-old artist Shania McDonagh has participated in the Texaco Children’s Art Competition, an art contest for children in Ireland held every year since 1955. Just looking at the astounding portrait above, it may come as no surprise that McDonagh has won the top prize for her age category every year since she was 12, and this year snagged the top prize overall with this hyperrealistic drawing of a man titled Coleman.

itscolossal:

For the past four years, 16-year-old artist Shania McDonagh has participated in the Texaco Children’s Art Competition, an art contest for children in Ireland held every year since 1955. Just looking at the astounding portrait above, it may come as no surprise that McDonagh has won the top prize for her age category every year since she was 12, and this year snagged the top prize overall with this hyperrealistic drawing of a man titled Coleman.


606 universal shelving system
by dieter rams
Rams’ ten principles of “good design”
1 Is innovative2 Makes a product useful3 Is aesthetic4 Makes a product understandable5 Is unobtrusive6 Is honest7 Is long-lasting8 Is thorough down to the last detail9 Is environmentally friendly10 Is as little design as possible
(via the absolute DESIGN blog…)

606 universal shelving system

by dieter rams

Rams’ ten principles of “good design”

1 Is innovative
2 Makes a product useful
3 Is aesthetic
4 Makes a product understandable
5 Is unobtrusive
6 Is honest
7 Is long-lasting
8 Is thorough down to the last detail
9 Is environmentally friendly
10 Is as little design as possible

(via the absolute DESIGN blog…)

(via thomortiz)

Just A Reminder Of How Small We Are

thatscienceguy:

This is the distribution of mass in the different planets, Mercury, Venus, Mars, and Earth making up just 1%.

And this is a distribution of all the mass in the solar system, including the sun - all the planets make up that tiny 0.14% left over after the sun…

(via sagansense)

jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

Rachel Sussman’s photographs of the oldest living things in the world – a masterpiece at the intersection of art, science, and philosophy.

With an artist’s gift for “aesthetic force” and a scientist’s rigorous respect for truth, Sussman straddles a multitude of worlds as she travels across space and time to unearth Earth’s greatest stories of resilience, stories of tragedy and triumph, past and future, but above all stories that humble our human lives, which seem like the blink of a cosmic eye against the timescales of these ancient organisms — organisms that have unflinchingly witnessed all of our own tragedies and triumphs, our wars and our revolutions, our holocausts and our renaissances, and have remained anchored to existence more firmly than we can ever hope to be.
Above all, however, the project raises questions that aren’t so much scientific or artistic as profoundly human: What is the meaning of human life if it comes and goes before a patch of moss has reached the end of infancy? How do our petty daily stresses measure up against a struggle for survival stretching back millennia? Who would we be if we relinquished our arrogant conviction that we are Earth’s biological crown jewel?

See more here.

I guarantee you that Rachel Sussman’s ten-year quest to chronicle the oldest living things on Earth will be the best thing you read about today. It will change the way you look at your life, and the life around you. It will change your perspective regarding your time on Earth, that everything, from fleeting mayflies to ancient mosses struggles for existence daily, and no matter how many sunrises we see, we should relish in each of them for their impermanence.
(Emphasis mine. Seriously… go to Brain Pickings and check out the rest. You can buy Sussman’s book here.)

jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

Rachel Sussman’s photographs of the oldest living things in the world – a masterpiece at the intersection of art, science, and philosophy.

With an artist’s gift for “aesthetic force” and a scientist’s rigorous respect for truth, Sussman straddles a multitude of worlds as she travels across space and time to unearth Earth’s greatest stories of resilience, stories of tragedy and triumph, past and future, but above all stories that humble our human lives, which seem like the blink of a cosmic eye against the timescales of these ancient organisms — organisms that have unflinchingly witnessed all of our own tragedies and triumphs, our wars and our revolutions, our holocausts and our renaissances, and have remained anchored to existence more firmly than we can ever hope to be.

Above all, however, the project raises questions that aren’t so much scientific or artistic as profoundly human: What is the meaning of human life if it comes and goes before a patch of moss has reached the end of infancy? How do our petty daily stresses measure up against a struggle for survival stretching back millennia? Who would we be if we relinquished our arrogant conviction that we are Earth’s biological crown jewel?

See more here.

I guarantee you that Rachel Sussman’s ten-year quest to chronicle the oldest living things on Earth will be the best thing you read about today. It will change the way you look at your life, and the life around you. It will change your perspective regarding your time on Earth, that everything, from fleeting mayflies to ancient mosses struggles for existence daily, and no matter how many sunrises we see, we should relish in each of them for their impermanence.

(Emphasis mine. Seriously… go to Brain Pickings and check out the rest. You can buy Sussman’s book here.)

kazu721010:

Butterfly House / Feldman Architecture

kazu721010:

Butterfly House / Feldman Architecture

kazu721010:

Butterfly House / Feldman Architecture

kazu721010:

Butterfly House / Feldman Architecture